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Friday, April 16, 2021

When Aaron Gwin Won At Leogang Without A Chain

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Screenshot via YouTube (Red Bull Bike)

Don’t ask us why it popped into our head this morning, but it did. Remember… remember when mountain biker Aaron Gwin won at Leogang in 2015 without the use of a chain? Remember when Aaron Gwin beat his rivals without pedalling at Leogang 2015? Remember the disbelief in the voices of the commentators when Aaron Gwin did all of the above at Leogang 2015? Some trip that, wasn’t it? Some trip at Leogang 2015? Can’t believe it was over five years ago already. Just want to run to it.

If you’re not familar with this iconic slice of sporting history, know that it’s probably – alongside Danny Hart’s effort at Champery 2011 – one of the most memorable downhill mountain biking efforts ever. After breaking his chain right at the start gate, you presume Gwin is just going to cruise down to the bottom in a bittersweet lap of honour affair. Instead, with nothing to lose and with essentially a free swing of the bat set before him, your man absoulutely guns it and somehow, miraculously, comes out on top.

“Never, since human beings first… started riding downhill at speed, had the sport seen it done quite like this”

Sure, there’s been bigger margins of victory and more wild riding before but never, since human beings first clambered onto saddles and started riding downhill at speed, had the sport seen it done quite like this. Gwin broke new ground that day. If you’ve got a spare five minutes today, why not give it another watch and bask in its glory all over again?

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